Daisy Museum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Daisy Airguns > Questions
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Daisy blue paint substitute?
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Daisy blue paint substitute?

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Author
Message
cobalt327 View Drop Down
Red Ryder Member
Red Ryder Member
Avatar

Joined: November-15-2013
Points: 1996
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cobalt327 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Daisy blue paint substitute?
    Posted: March-18-2020 at 8:27pm
A friend just turned me on to this company. There are several shades of DuraBlue paint designed to simulate gun bluing, so there might be something close enough to Daisy blue to get the job done. And the paint has a hardening agent so there a good chance it'll be a lot more durable than run of the mill rattle can spray paint, although that also means a shorter shelf life after it's activated. It ain't cheap but if there were several guns to do, it's reasonable enough.




Back to Top
BSAGuy View Drop Down
Red Ryder Member
Red Ryder Member
Avatar

Joined: January-30-2019
Location: Central NC
Points: 479
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BSAGuy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March-19-2020 at 12:28pm
Wow.  That's a great find/tip, Cobalt.  I have heard of Duracost, but not that Durablue product.
Be Prepared
Back to Top
cobalt327 View Drop Down
Red Ryder Member
Red Ryder Member
Avatar

Joined: November-15-2013
Points: 1996
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cobalt327 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March-20-2020 at 10:38am
I'm thinking the Polished Blue-Black might be closest. I'm going to contact them, maybe they'll be receptive to making a dedicated Daisy Blue finish for us. 

To be continued...
Back to Top
Gumslinger View Drop Down
Red Ryder Member
Red Ryder Member
Avatar

Joined: March-20-2019
Location: SW Florida
Points: 233
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gumslinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March-20-2020 at 9:11pm

In 1951 Daisy heard about the new electro-coating process developed in Indianapolis by the Ransbo Electro-coating Corp (1951). They flew Daisy parts back & forth, and in the words of Cass Hough “drove paint companies up the wall” trying to find the proper paints for this new process. The paint equipment set-up at Plymouth didn’t happen until summer of 1953. It finally switched on in the fall of 1953.

He never mentions the paint source (and I believe they bought the paint), but they certainly applied it themselves in Plymouth and in Rogers.

I mention this because it would be great to know the source of the paint, as it might be possible to track down the original formulations & colors from the manufacturer--it only takes a few lines of print to note & preserve the specs--and paint companies have every reason to preserve that information for future use. A modern day paint outfit could mix it up exactly if they had this info in hand. Just a thought….

Back to Top
cobalt327 View Drop Down
Red Ryder Member
Red Ryder Member
Avatar

Joined: November-15-2013
Points: 1996
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cobalt327 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March-21-2020 at 8:03am
That makes sense. The paint specs might could be used to duplicate the color using modern ingredients. I doubt with all the EPA restrictions if any company today could make a paint exactly like was used in the 50s and '60s, but there's computerized equipment to match paint, so matching the hue is less of an issue than is getting a paint that can be applied by the home hobbyist that's as durable as the original Daisy blue. That's hard to do from an aerosol can like DuraCoat seems to have done with their 'can in a can' hardener deal. I'm afraid this will be a tough nut to crack unless DuraCoat's existing colors can be used.

I wonder just how smooth the finish will be using an aerosol can. I read the instructions and the final 'wet' coat is what's all-important for a good looking job. That's where applying just a little too much gives you a run. Very iffy on that being successful when applying paint from a spray can. I can spray paint using an air brush and that would be the way I'd want to go, but the cost seems excessive for what I'm wanting to do- which is repaint fairly common Daisys that have no collector interest to speak of. Guns that I want to look as good as they shoot.
Back to Top
BSAGuy View Drop Down
Red Ryder Member
Red Ryder Member
Avatar

Joined: January-30-2019
Location: Central NC
Points: 479
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BSAGuy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March-21-2020 at 11:04am
Try it on a hopeless beater first to start your learning curve, Cobalt.  Each can probably has enough to cover 2-3 4 guns anyway since there really isn't much surface on a BB gun.

Also, I would assume like any paint job that really good prep and painting under proper temperature and humidity would go a long way toward success.
Be Prepared
Back to Top
Gumslinger View Drop Down
Red Ryder Member
Red Ryder Member
Avatar

Joined: March-20-2019
Location: SW Florida
Points: 233
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gumslinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March-21-2020 at 8:55pm

Spray can painting can be done well with some prep, ie--staging. You need to be able to do clean, even sweeps at the same distance without disturbing your piece. Horizontal  staging is your best friend.

 For my No. 25 removable barrels I made a simple jig consisting of one piece of 1 x 4 pine, 2 @ ½” PVC “Ts” and 2 @ flat, threaded ½” PVC caps. Two short lengths of ¾” dowel and it is complete.

I drilled holes in the flat bases of the ½” threaded caps. Then screwed through them into the pine. The “Ts” are not threaded, just ‘slip’ style, and they drop over the fastened caps. I can rotate the barrel as I do paint sweeps, and I let it dry on the jig.

 You can do the same for carbines, but you will have to run a screw thru the empty stock holes in the receiver and through an inserted dowel at that end. You get the picture.

 It makes for a fine paint job if you do it slowly & lightly, coat after light coat, until it looks good to you.




Back to Top
cobalt327 View Drop Down
Red Ryder Member
Red Ryder Member
Avatar

Joined: November-15-2013
Points: 1996
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cobalt327 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March-22-2020 at 8:03am
That's neat!
Back to Top
BSAGuy View Drop Down
Red Ryder Member
Red Ryder Member
Avatar

Joined: January-30-2019
Location: Central NC
Points: 479
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BSAGuy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March-22-2020 at 8:30am
What a great idea, Jay.  Thanks for sharing that with us.
Be Prepared
Back to Top
Bavaria55n View Drop Down
Red Ryder Member
Red Ryder Member


Joined: October-12-2015
Location: CentralIllinois
Points: 647
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bavaria55n Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March-22-2020 at 9:04am
Like so many great 'inventions' that really looks simple but I never would have thought of it.
Thanks.
Gary
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.03
Copyright ©2001-2015 Web Wiz Ltd.