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Daisy blue paint substitute?

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Gumslinger View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Gumslinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-13-2020 at 12:50am

In my rationale of “save the Daisy's”, I have been restoring these samples (just for practice, as they are not collectibles per se). Therefore I can be a bit more aggressive in my cleanups.

I use a wire wheel on a pedestal-mounted bench grinder. This brass-looking wire wheel (see pic) seems softer than regular wire wheels, and works quickly. I don’t have guards on my wire wheel so I can work my pieces at any angle. I know, I know--you’ll put your eye out… but I do wear face and body protection. I don’t recommend this practice to novices--I am just explaining how these rust buckets can be brought back to life.

Depending upon the end result, I either paint or re-blue the items. My engraved No 25s look better blued, but if they are too worn or rusty as to obliterate the details, I just go ahead and spray paint them. After long curing periods I reassemble & restore their function. Fun for me, and a gift to the future. As I said before…save the Daisy's.








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cobalt327 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cobalt327 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-13-2020 at 1:14am
The blued 25 looks especially good. What bluing did you use?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BSAGuy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-13-2020 at 8:23am
Those look really nice, Jay.  Do you do some buffing after the brass brushing?  Same question as Cobalt on the bluing that you use, plus what paint do you use?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Airitis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-13-2020 at 8:54am
Hey Gumslinger,

I concur. I never use collectables for any of my projects. The way I figure it: The lower the value, the lower the guilt. Hehehe.
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Gumslinger View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gumslinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-13-2020 at 12:07pm

I copied part of this over from another post I made last year. (I wish we had a consolidated fix-it corner in this forum). I have learned so much here, but only in bits & pieces from different threads after long searches.

The bluing I use is generic Beechwood-Casey from Walmart. This version is Super blue. Two or three coats is a fine-looking finish. Bluing is an interesting exercise. Make sure you read up on it. Two caveats: Clean, clean, clean, and heat, heat, heat. I use powder-free gloves (carefully donned to keep fingerprints off the outside of the gloves), eye protection, and a heat gun.

Heat? Too hot to handle works for me (I do a lot of juggling while coating the parts). It really makes a difference.

A quick dip in baking-soda water to cool & neutralize the part, and then buff, buff, buff to even out the result. The buffing solves a lot of what initially looks like a disaster. To buff safely & quickly I use fine Bronze wool (from Amazon) When it comes out nice--wow! When it goes the other way--take a long walk, reflect on life & smile.

I’ll get back to you on the painting aspect later today.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BSAGuy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-13-2020 at 2:56pm
Thanks for that explanation, Jay.  That's very helpful.  

To your point on collecting repair, etc. information, I just copy it into a separate Word document on my own computer.  That way, I have information in a single place for easy reference.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gumslinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-13-2020 at 10:53pm

I have a large assortment of stainless & brass brushes from different projects over the years. (I never use sandpaper). For interior cleaning (if necessary) I use a suggestion from Cobalt: he uses a brass brush from a 12-gauge shotgun cleaning kit. I actually use a 10-gauge brush. It fits more snugly without distorting, and spun on a drill, actually polishes the barrel interiors. I also use it to polish the compression chamber on the stock side of the abutment. I have a face-forward brass brush to polish the abutment face to better stick the abutment seal later.

My best hand-held interior brushes are brass on straight handles (like a toothbrush--but hard to find as most have offset handles). All sizes of brass & stainless brushes range from teeny air paint-gun cleaning equipment, up to test tube cleaners, pipe cleaners, bottle cleaners, and the like. I even use different caliber firearm-cleaning brushes (they make some neat stuff).

 Now for post-wheel work, I use fine bronze wool, never steel wool. Bronze dust doesn’t rust, and even with tack cloths or pressurized air you can never get all the steel wool dust out of internals, crevices or crannies. It is also my go-to for buffing bluing items!!!

 I use Krylon Premium Automotive Enamel in Flat Onyx Black, #8641 as a tough enamel base coat. Krylon sprays very fine with good color coverage per sweep. I then top coat with Krylon ColorMaxx in Satin Black, #5557.  It sprays like a dream. 

Lately I cannot find the Flat Onyx Black, so I have been simply using layers of Satin Black.

Me, I cannot take a good picture of a ‘black’ paint job, but to my eye it looks very appropriate on a BB gun.

 Now a word about spray paint. There is ‘dry’ (to the touch), ‘dry’(to handle), and then ‘dry’ (to recoat). But the most important ‘dry’ of all is CURED. Cured paint is done, finished, no mo’….

This is hard paint, and ready for assembly. That said, it can take up to 30-days for paint to cure. Which is why my shop looks like a wind-chime factory made up of hanging Daisy parts. In the meantime I have plenty of other projects going on, so ‘waiting’ is not in my vocabulary. It is more like: what, it’s been a month already? Hope these suggestions can be of some use.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cobalt327 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-13-2020 at 11:24pm
Great info Jay- thank you!!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BSAGuy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-14-2020 at 8:14am
That is great info., Jay.  Extremely helpful.  Thanks for sharing your techniques.
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