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dating a No 111 Model 40

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AIRGUNNERMD View Drop Down
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Joined: April-02-2010
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AIRGUNNERMD Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-07-2014 at 2:31pm
Guys,
How would you know the difference between the logo being burnt in or silk screened?
Does the burnt in look black?
Would the silk screened wear off?
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oldwizzer View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldwizzer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-07-2014 at 3:16pm

Silk screened will look like its painted on, burned on will be indented.

 
Ejwills.
Ejwills
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cobalt327 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cobalt327 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November-07-2018 at 3:03pm
Originally posted by willielumplump willielumplump wrote:

Another feature to check out is the shot tube; at the end with the thread that seats it over the air tube, there is a loading chute that the BBs follow to the loading point; the narrow channel (1940-1942) is indicative of the very early variations, and the wider loading chute (1947-1954) the latter versions.  This gem of information came from Gary Garber's outstanding book, "An Encyclopedia of Daisy Plymouth Guns," which sadly, is out of print. 
Additionally there was a brief time when the Red Ryder logo on the stock was silk-screened, estimated to be about 1000 of them, either in 1941 or 1942, because the machine that burned the logo into the stock had broke down.
 
When I acquire a new/used specimen, I always inspect the shot tube, checking for the BB retaining spring or the gap in the loading chute, or just to verify that the shot tube is not clogged, and that there is in fact, an air tube at the base of the muzzle.Wink
Just wanted to add that the 1946 111-40 Red Ryder with iron lever, non adjustable sights and blued bands, etc. (Variation 4 Daisy King http://www.daisyking.com/history/chronology/Chapter02.swf) could have a large or small top stock screw and could also have a narrow or wide BB chute on the shot tube. I have an example of the DK V4 111-40 and it has the narrow chute and  large top stock screw. Powerplant is same as the V1 copper band gun I have. Both very hard hitters compared to new Daisy BB guns.
 

111-40 EARLY RED RYDER "LARGE" TOP STOCK SCREW:

OAL 1-13/16”, 1.817”

Under head shaft length 1-11/16”, 1.680”

Unthreaded shaft length 0.508”, 1/2”

Shaft diameter 0.188”, 3/16”

Head diameter 11/32” , 0.345”

Head thickness 9/64”, 0.140”

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