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Plastic stocks

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oldwizzer View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldwizzer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-15-2020 at 10:49am
Thanks for posting all the pictures !

Ejwills.

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cobalt327 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cobalt327 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-15-2020 at 10:15pm
This thread likely has as much info on these stocks as there is anywhere! (Which is to say, I agree- there's not any info on them to speak of.)
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oldwizzer View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldwizzer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-16-2020 at 12:33pm
The joy is in the journey!

Ejwills.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cobalt327 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-16-2020 at 7:56pm
Originally posted by oldwizzer oldwizzer wrote:

The joy is in the journey!

Ejwills.
You hit the nail on the head for me! Some folks like shooting their guns and that's what they get the most satisfaction from, others like collecting and the hunt for them, and I'm sure there are many other reasons we like airguns. For me, I get a lot of enjoyment from researching them. And I get it that a lot of people would be bored senseless by this! lol But I do get a kick out of helping to fill in gaps in the community knowledge base. Well, that, along with all the rest too! 
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Gumslinger View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gumslinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-16-2020 at 10:45pm

Ditto for my questions on Daisy plastics. Whether or not one enjoys plastic or wood, they are all Daisy's, and when a kid opens up his first box, he doesn’t care what the parts are, or what the history is--it’s HIS first Daisy.

 Also, Daisy made wood stocks for the No. 25 from 1914 to 1952, and that equals about 38 years of production. But they made plastic stocks from 1953 to 2004, and that equals 51 years of production. So there are millions of kids still out there who only knew of, and loved their plastic guns.

That is why I wanted to shed whatever light I could on Daisy plastics. Hopefully the information will help someone to figure out a way to save, or to fix their own gun stocks--to pass them on to the next generation of Daisy nuts.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote twocompassheads Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-18-2020 at 12:49pm
Very good information here.  I want to give my thought on plastic stocks, why do we find some in very bad condition and some just with a slight warping and some without any warping.  My thought on this is after Daisy took care of the very early stock problem then from that point on it all had to do with storage after you were done with it.  Think about the conditions they were put through, stored in a closet and standing on the stock at a slight angle in the heat of the summer.  Very little air conditioning in the 50's to the 90's.  Also left in the garage or in the trunk of the car in the 90 to 100 degree heat.  Or sat outside on the porch in the sun until it was picked up and brought in.  I think the best way to store in a vertical position is to store it on the barrel with the stock upright or lay the gun down without anything on top of it.  
    I find that the 1894 didn't have the problems that the model 25 pump did.  I only see a slight warp in some of the stocks.  I'm going to cut one in half length wise and see how many bulkheads (bracing) are inside and report back.  I don't have a sacrificial model 25 stock but I bet there is a significant difference in the two.
Ride and Have Fun
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oldwizzer View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldwizzer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-18-2020 at 1:44pm
And a great job you do ! 

Ed.
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stevec View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stevec Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-18-2020 at 6:05pm
From what I understand the early plastic was called Bakelite and was very unstable. Took a few years for everyone to get the plastic right. You gotta understand that Bakelite was new and was only used on small things. Doing big things like stocks really tested it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gumslinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-18-2020 at 7:34pm
Wait--don't sacrifice another Daisy stock! I have already filleted a Red Ryder stock (see the pictures back a few pages in this thread) and have done the same for a No. 25 stock. They are basically the same internal structure. I am currently awaiting a stock from the Powerline series to see what surprise may be in that stock. I will keep you posted.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gumslinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-29-2020 at 11:15pm

This was an unknown vintage Powerline stock. Easy to fillet (the metal plates were a surprise) but a real bear to remove the injected foam (the foam is injected thru a hole under the buttplate). It was also filled with 250+ steel BBs. The plastic shell was quite robust. I don’t know what the material is, but the smell the Dremel generated was definitely different from other Daisy's.

I wish Daisy had begun their plastic production with a shell this thick. Foam filling or not, with a little thicker wall, their early stocks might have resisted warping and would have been fine today.

 All in all, this Powerline has a nice stable stock. But again--I don’t know it’s vintage, or how long the foam filling continued.

I know it was referenced back in 1971 (The American BB Gun, p81) but I have never heard it mentioned anywhere else, or if it continues today. See the next post for the foamed-in picture.


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