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Please help to identify Daisy 460?

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Wingnut1269 View Drop Down
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    Posted: February-21-2019 at 11:59pm
I've acquired a very old....and super cool....Daisy break barrel air rifle. It is .22 cal and it says Made for Daisy Scotland 460 on the barrel. I'm looking for the usual info.....age, model, specs, rarity, value, etc. Thoughts on condition would be welcomed, too. Thanks for looking. Please forgive me if this link doesn't work, I'm not good with adding pics to forums.  

 https://imgur.com/a/0XZl6QE
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Wingnut1269 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-05-2019 at 5:39pm
Anybody?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BSAGuy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-05-2019 at 7:12pm
Hi Wingnut,

I just saw your post.  I can't really help with any ID, other then what I found below.  It seems like most of the posters here are more into the older American guns in .177 BB caliber.  I am not sure if you will get much info here.   Also, this forum is not as active as others that you may frequent. 

I did a little digging around.  Looks like there was a company in England called Milbro (Millard Brothers) that made guns that were re-branded for Daisy in the UK.  For instance, the Daisy 220 is a re-branded Milbro G22.

If the numbers are consistent and a G22 = Daisy 220, then a Daisy 460 should be a Milbro G46.

Sho 'nuff, I googled Milbro G46 and found several hits including this:

"Milbro made air rifles after WW2, on pre-war production machinery from the Diana factory in Germany. Initially they made close copies of the German guns, but eventually the designs evolved with re-designed stocks, triggers, sights, etc.

The G46 is one of these guns. I believe the basic architecture of it is inherited from the Diana model 27. I believe the G46 was made in the 1970's and was intended as a beginner's target rifle. IMHO it is one of the nicer Milbro products.

Dennis Hiller's book "The Collector's Guide to Air Rifles" has a lot of good information on the Milbro guns, including some parts diagrams, etc."

Google "Milbro G46 "and you can read the dope for yourself and find some pics.  They look the same as yours to me.

Condition looks OK.  Metal looks nice, but the wood has taken a little hard use.

Does the gun work?  If you need arts, I think you can find some in the UK here: https://www.gunspares.co.uk/products/24461/G46/

Here is an earlier thread here on Daisy Scotland 220's.  They are cousins to your rifle. 

How and where did you come across this?  I always like to hear the back story on stuff.


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BSAGuy View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BSAGuy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-05-2019 at 7:17pm
Here is a pic for anyone who wants to see it

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BSAGuy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-05-2019 at 9:24pm
Here is more dope that I found on Milbro:

After, WWII, Milbro got all the M&G tooling as War Booty from Germany and it went to Millard Bros in Scotland and production resumed in Great Britain and Scotland.
Daisy contracted with Milbro for the new Model 250, a .22 caliber wood stocked Springer. It's a nice gun with BSA-like shaping to the wood, A rounded grip (M&G like). with a grooved butt.

The Milbro design has a manual safety lever on the right side of the reciever/stock.   The sights are much like the M&G rear with a round hooded post front.
Daisy contracted for 2 rifles, both .22's A  model 230 and the 250.
Many confuse the Milbros with Diana's but the 250 is a model all it's own. It is not a M&G product. Some parts may be M&G parts but few look familiar.
 



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bavaria55n Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-06-2019 at 9:25am
I have seen the 230 and 250 before but never a 460.
Looks like a larger more powerful version?
Gary
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldwizzer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-06-2019 at 1:32pm
I have never seen a Daisy 460 before, nice find. Daisy imported a number of Milbro pellet guns in the 1960's including model 160, 220, 225, 230, and 250. the Milbro  C46 came with target sights, so who ever had the gun replaced it with the scope or Daisy ordered them without the target sight. Its a keeper for sure!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BSAGuy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-09-2019 at 9:07pm
Here is some more information that I found about Diana and Millard Brothers (Milbro) over at the Pyramid Air site.  The Diana 27 looks almost identical to the original poster's Daisy 460.

Diana 27 – a golden oldie

by B.B. Pelletier

Let’s take a look at one of the longest-running airgun models ever made – the Diana model 27. The history given here is condensed from Blue Book of Airguns, Fifth Edition.


My Diana 27 was made in 1967 for the Hy-Score company. It’s a Hy-Score 807.

A long run
Diana is a German airgun firm with a long, colorful history.
 Started in 1890, the company survived two world wars and numerous civil upheavals, as well as several crushing depressions. In the U.S. today, Diana is so closely associated with RWS that many people believe RWS makes the airguns, but that isn’t the case. Diana makes them, and RWS simply imports them into this country under their own label.

The model 27 was first made in 1910, though it looked much different back then. The gun had only a buttstock – no forearm at all. In fact, it wasn’t until after World War II that the model 27 got a normal-looking stock.

Many names, but just one gun
The Diana model 27 has been sold in this country under several names.
 Just a few of the important ones are Beeman, Original, Hy-Score, Winchester and Milbro. All but Milbro were actually German Diana model 27 guns under other names.

The Milbro guns deserve more explanation. As partial reparations for World War II, the United Kingdom secured the rights, tooling, machinery, parts and drawings of Diana air rifles. Millard Brothers of London made Diana guns in Scotland that were also sold in the U.S. under the Daisy brand name, though I don’t believe they ever made the model 27 for them. During the years when Milbro made Dianas, the restarted German firm had to use the name “Original” to avoid confusion. After Milbro folded, the Germans got back the Diana name.

The Diana 27 was famous for the trigger with the ball bearing sear
Diana pioneered a type of trigger that uses three ball bearings to hold the piston when the gun is cocked.
 A complex arrangement of springs, bearings and nested cages and bearing races keep pressure on the piston stem until the trigger releases it. Adjusting this trigger is difficult, but once it is adjusted properly, it is as nice as any conventional trigger.

The 27 was just the right size and power!
This was not a magnum airgun.
 In .22, it shoots medium-weight pellets in the mid- to high-400s. In .177, it gets close to 600 with medium pellets. Why do so many airgunners flip over the gun? Because its so smooth, so easy to cock and light enough to shoot offhand all day long. A 27 is deadly accurate and so understressed that it keeps on shooting long after more powerful guns need a spring change.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bavaria55n Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-10-2019 at 9:18am
Great detective work.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldwizzer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-10-2019 at 3:28pm
take a look at the rear of the receive, can you see where a target site was mounted, screw holes .
Ejwills.
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