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Rejuvenate or replace leather seals

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cobalt327 View Drop Down
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    Posted: January-03-2019 at 6:43pm

SOAKING LEATHER SEALS WITH OIL 

Leather seal guns don’t have an “OIL HERE” hole. Oiling the seals is done by dripping oil in from the lever flange area. Oil can also be dripped into the shot tube. It helps to block the lever partly open. After applying the oil, switch between butt down and muzzle down about twice a day for up to a week. Be sure to have the gun over something that will catch the oil that inevitably leaks out.

 

Getting oil to the seals can be done more efficiently by making a tool from a length of 3/16” OD brass tubing that has a short length of weed trimmer fuel line (or similar tubing) attached to the end of the brass tubing. Keep the flexible tubing short so it is stiff enough to fit over the air tube. The tool is inserted into the shroud where the flexible tubing is a snug fit over the air tube. Then the oil is squirted into the tubing and allowed to drain (or it can be blown) down into the compression chamber. I use a block of wood between the cocking lever and receiver to hold the plunger piston away from the barrel seal before adding the oil. Let it sit butt down over something that will catch any oil that leaks out. Switch between butt down and muzzle down like mentioned above. Add oil as needed- you should hear a wet squishing sound when you work the lever from closed to partially open. No need to fully cock it during this process but if you do it’s no problem, just dry fire it (avoiding the oil that will spray out). Keep doing this for up to a week and if that doesn't revive it, ain't nothing gonna help but fresh seals.

 
Once you have completed the soaking, dry fire the gun a couple dozen times with the muzzle down to help get rid of the excess oil. Also clean the inside of the shroud where the BBs are stored when you load the gun. Oil there will make the BBs and shot tube oily. And oil on the BBs or in the shot tube kills accuracy so don't expect it to shoot to POA while the shot tube is oily inside. Clean the shot tube often. Eventually patches will come out clean but it will take a lot of shooting and a lot of cleanings before they do. Also, the gun will continue to smoke from the shot tube long after the soaking is done, but it's harmless other than some oil may still come out in a fine mist that can settle on things so be aware of that.

 

ETA, use thin viscosity motor oil and don't give a second though to it being a detergent oil. Pellgunoil is detergent motor oil, after all. In fact, I use detergent multi-grade motor oil, 5w-20 Mobil 1.

 

If you choose to oil the seals through the shot tube and not to make a tool to put the oil in through the air tube, you want to clean the oil from the shot tube when you're done. The shot tube will continue to get oiled up from the mist of oil being discharged from compression chamber by the now-wet seals every time it's shot- this cannot be helped and while it's doing this accuracy will be subpar. Only after many, many shots will leather seals settle down and quit expelling a smoky mist every shot and then accuracy will improve as long as the shot tube is still periodically cleaned free of oil. If there's one real negative to leather seals- the last two sentences describes it. I shoot all my guns and want them to be as accurate as possible, so I personally prefer to use synthetic seals to replace the leather ones when they need replacement.

 
One way around all the mess and to have the best chance of maintaining accuracy is to disassemble the gun and with the plunger in hand, apply oil sparingly to the piston seal allowing it to soak in between applications. Same thing for the barrel seal, although getting oil on the seal can be tricky- dripping it down the inside of the gun seems to go everywhere except the seal, but as long as the oil hits the walls of the compression chamber, it'll reach the barrel seal. But only use a little at a time, allowing it plenty of time (hours) to soak in between applications. The whole routine can take several days if the seals are really dry. Use paper towels to blot the barrel seal of excess oil after its saturated- wad it up and push it against the barrel seal with a wooden dowel. Same for the piston seal- blot with paper towels. If oil contaminates the BB magazine inside the front part of the barrel shroud, if you care about accuracy it has to be cleaned out. Oily BBs are as bad as an oily shot tube for killing accuracy! Most people won't go to all this trouble and are satisfied adding oil through the shot tube and be done with it.
 
If you take it apart and you see the leather has become dry rotted and/or is missing chunks or the leather is flaking away/falling apart, they're toast and you need to then decide which type seal you want to replace them with. I can't help with where's best to get leather seal. I buy synthetic seals from Daisy, it's good to have several things you need to help defray shipping costs.

 

 

I'm sure other members will have there own thoughts on all this, and I encourage anyone with an opinion to chime in! My way is not the only way and may not be the best way- it's simply the way I do it.

 
CONVERT LEATHER SEALS TO SYNTHETIC
 
On some Daisy BB gun models like the No. 25 pump gun, 111-40 Red Ryder, 155 and others it's possible to convert the original leather 13/16” OD plunger head (piston) and abutment/barrel seal from the leather type (with the captive air tube) to synthetic seals/separate air tube by using the seals from the current production model 25. The condition of the barrel seal is important- the hole in the barrel seal needs to be a snug fit to the air tube. If the hole is too big it will lose pressure and the MV falls. But if the existing leather barrel seal is still okay, it can be left in and used with the new style synthetic piston, air tube and retainer pin.

 

The one piece air tube/leather seal piston assembly uses a short pin that goes through the coils of the spring. This short pin is not used with the synthetic piston. Instead, the spring is installed behind the new style pin just like on the current Red Ryder, etc.

NOTE: Be sure to use a metal washer behind the piston, same as Daisy does. It gives support to the rubber that isn't needed on the leather type piston/air tube assembly. The washer is 3/4" OD x 3/8" ID x 1/16" thick (0.750" OD x 0.375" ID x 0.0625" thick). The washer is not available separately from Daisy.

 

PARTS NEEDED TO CONVERT FROM 13/16” OD LEATHER SEALS TO SYNTHETIC (can be bought directly from Daisy)

130225-100      Plunger head $1.50 each

130126-100      Barrel seal $1.00 each

150272-100      Air Tube $1.50 each

132938-000      Plunger Pin $0.050 each- this pin has to be used, the original short pin will not work, nor will the earlier long round pin- the correct pin has flats on each side so it will fit the hole in the air tube.

 

 
 
DAISY CONTACT INFO

Current (as of 3-27-19):


Daisy Online Contact form: https://www.daisy.com/contactus
Daisy Customer Service/Parts Ordering email address: info@daisy.com

Daisy Customer Service phone: 479-636-1200

 

 

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FREEBIRD View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FREEBIRD Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-03-2019 at 7:18pm
Good stuff, I have tried a few times to put the synthetic plungers in old 25's and they would not fit?
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cobalt327 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cobalt327 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-03-2019 at 10:07pm
Piston wouldn't fit into the compression chamber or the piston wouldn't fit onto the plunger, or ?
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BurghDude View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BurghDude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-03-2019 at 10:19pm
Thanks for the post Cobalt! 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FREEBIRD Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-04-2019 at 5:39pm
Would'nt go down the compression tube
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cobalt327 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cobalt327 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January-05-2019 at 1:05am
If you were using a piston from a Red Ryder or Buck, etc., they're 7/8" OD. You need an 13/16" piston. If you bought a new one for a Model 25, they could have sent the wrong part- they look the same until you compare them side by side, or try to use the wrong one.
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